Why everyone should write their own obituary

  • By: Penny Lipsett / The Globe and Mail

At a recent annual gathering, I mentioned to guests at my end of the dinner table that I’d written an obituary that day. My own. The woman across from me quickly quipped: “Too much time on your hands?”
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I Went To The Canadian Mosque Where Six Muslims Were Killed: On the ways we counter collective forgetting

  • By: Syed Hussan / CANADALAND

At first glance, there are no bullet holes. The light green walls show no signs. It is calm here, subdued, inviting inner quiet. The brittle, dark green carpet with soft orange rows has been washed
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The comfort of memorial websites

  • By: Emine Saner / The Guardian

Memorial websites are sites where friends and family members upload photographs, sometimes videos and favourite music tracks, with space for people to leave their memories and messages of condolence.
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How to Make an Online Memorial

  • By: Qeepr / Talk Death

When those we love pass away, it can leave us feeling overwhelmed. We may ask ourselves, why and what now? With these questions comes the need to remember and properly memorialize the deceased.
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OMG RIP :'(

  • By: C.S.-W. / The Economist

AFTER the eulogies and the soggy sandwiches, most relatives of the deceased go on with their lives never to return to their loved one’s gravestones. Now they can continue the grieving process online: a growing number of websites allow leaving messages and maintaining a vigil on memorial pages.
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Untangling the web: how the internet has changed the way we treat death

  • By: Aleks Krotoski / The Guardian

It is a most basic fact of life: we will all die. There are no creams, no pills, no incantations that can change this. However, more and more of us have the opportunity to perpetuate ourselves by the grace of overenthusiastic automated Facebook reminders and the digital archives of identity that we upload with pieces of us.
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